You Are Here: Home » Entertainment (Page 36)

The Normal Heart

"I'll agree to the fact that I have any number of awful character traits. But not to the fact that whatever they did to us as kids automatically made me sick and gay while you stayed straight and healthy." Welcome to The Normal Heart. When I left my faculty position at Greenville College last year to pursue an MFA in stage management from the University of Illinois, I already knew 3 things: 1. I was ridiculously blessed by this opportunity, 2. my faith was one of the few things unwelcome in the theatre world, and 3. I would be working on The Normal Heart. What I didn't expect was that I would have my faith both challenged and strengthened while working on The Normal Heart, nor that I would walk away completely captivated by the story and truth of the show. In the midst of the 80s AIDS crisis, a love story between 2 gay men, and playwright Larry Kramer's angry railings against everyone imaginable - the straight world, the gay world, Christians, non-Christians, the rich, the government, etc. - lives The Normal Heart. And it is tragic. And beautiful. ...

Read more

The Evolution of Gaming….Old School Style!!

Written by Russell Sztukowski. Media by Michael Trieb. For many thousands of years, cultures have entertained themselves with games. Board games have been thought to date back five or six millennia to small wooden artifacts found in the tombs of the pharaohs, to carved stone tablets found in South American ruins. While many ancient games still remain, such as Chess, Checkers, Go, Mancala, and Backgammon, since the start of the 20th century, the popularity of board games has increased dramatically. Throughout the 1900’s board games seemed to be a very popular family activity. Tons of new companies sprung up and began producing names we know and love today, such as Monopoly, Scrabble, Clue, Sorry, and many others. Into the late 70’s, 80’s, and early 90’s, it seemed as if board games reached their pinnacle. New and intriguing ideas and concepts were coming out on the fly, and more complicated games were being created involving moving parts, batteries, small electronic mechanisms, and large colorful and decorated setups. One may begin to wonder where these types of games went to. Today, the, the most common games we see played are card games, classic favorites, or simple setup games, like Apples-to-Apples, Uno, Trivia Games, Monopoly and the like. Why did the board game market find a peak and taper off into a steep decline coming into the 21st century? What happened to the creativity of the game companies? ...

Read more

The Return Of The Doctor

It’s not very often one gets to write a 1,000-word article on 50 years of history, so here’s my best go at the situation. March 30th marks the return of the highly anticipated seventh series (a fancy word for season) of, you guessed it, Doctor Who. Now for many of you, the very mention of the good Doctor sends shivers down your geeky spines but for a lot of you, you groan and roll your eyes and spout witty insults such as, “Doctor Who Cares?” Sorry to rain on your bitterly ignorant parade, but Doctor Who happens to be the longest running television show of all time (eat it The Simpsons). But before we get to where the series is now, let’s take a look at how it all started. ...

Read more

Is Oz Great and Powerful?

When the name Sam Raimi pops into your mind, I’m going to go out on a limb and assume that the first thing you think of isn’t a family film. Yes, he did make the Spider-Man trilogy, but those were PG-13 superhero flicks, a very different beast than Oz the Great and Powerful, a PG, family-oriented adventure story set in a colorful world that tries (and usually manages) to be fun and light-hearted enough for the kids while still entertaining for us older folks. I’m a diehard Raimi fanatic, so I knew from day one that this would be a trip to the theater for me. I was pleasantly surprised by how much I ended up liking it, though. Raimi is a unique director, known for his quirkiness, and I was somewhat astounded by how much of that quirkiness he fit into what is, in the end, a Disney movie aimed at the youngins. Be it his smash cut zooms (at a variety of crooked angles) that will have Evil Dead fans quietly giggling to themselves, the short but joyous recreation of the floating-above-the-table-dance from Drag Me To Hell when the Wicked Witch tinkers with James Franco’s Oz, or the big scares that he sneaks in to ruin kids lives for a while much like the 1939 classic’s Wicked Witch ruined many of ours, this really is a Sam Raimi picture, and that wasn’t something I had any hope of it being. Sam has an unfortunate history of studios ruining his work (Spider-Man 3, of course). ...

Read more

Trailer Trash: Iron Meatball Oblivion About Nothing

Welcome to Trailer Trash!! A new program being implemented to the new and improved Papyrus Entertainment section (we only say new and improved now because we are bringing something new), Trailer Trash is a place where myself (Austin Schumacher) and that other guy (Jake Cannon) will be bringing you some of the latest releases in movie trailers and revealing our thoughts about them. This weeks entries include Cloudy With a Chance of Meatballs 2, Oblivion, Iron Man 3, and Much Ado About Nothing. So hang on for the ride as we take you down the dark winding paths of our minds and opinions about movies.....well, not really, but sometimes there is a tidbit or two that is rather interesting. Anyways, enjoy!! ...

Read more

Fit For A King – Creation/Destruction

Following a self-released debut album, Fit For A King signed with Solid State Records in 2011. Their first album, Creation|Destruction, with Solid State was just recently released (March 12), and it is an excellent beginning album with which both the band and Solid State should be quite pleased. From the starting gate, Creation|Destruction comes out strong with the song “Warpath,” a heavy opener that immediately presents FFAK’s unique mix of technical precision and gutsy groove. ...

Read more

Anna Karenina Book Review

Written by Megan Gunn. Media by Briana Phillips. “Happy families are all alike; every unhappy family is unhappy in its own way,” so begins Anna Karenina (Анна Каренина) by Russian author Leo Tolstoy. The novel was published in installments from 1873 to 1877 in the magazine The Russian Messenger. Fellow author William Faulkner once said that Anna Karenina was “the best novel ever written,” and many people ha ...

Read more

Christians Rated R: Part III (Application – The Boondock Saints)

For the past couple of weeks, the Papyrus has run “Christians Rated R” part I and part II discussing why and how Christians should go about engaging Rated “R” films. (We have worked to provide a method/argument for a way of coming to these films on their own terms while still retaining a Christian identity). This week concludes this series with a final installment that explores an “R” rated film in an attempt to put our thoughts into practice. I have chosen for this piece a film from the late 90s entitled The Boondock Saints. Essentially, the film is about two Irish brothers who, after defending themselves and others in a bar fight, are attacked by low-level enforcers for the Russian mob. The brothers end up killing the enforcers, after which they receive a prophetic call from God to go and smite out that which is evil so that “that which is good may flourish.” The brothers go about systematically tracking down members of the Russian mob and other criminals who they believe are doing evil things. In this process, they develop a relationship with a federal detective who tries to discern whether or not what the brothers are doing is righteous. The brothers believe that they are acting in the truth and justice of God, for they are doing what is necessary to keep the tyranny of evil at bay. The overall sentiment of the film is that the indifference of good people is a worse evil than intentionally evil actions. ...

Read more

The Following Review

Whenever we see a network promoting a new show we can always assume one of three things: It’s a crime drama, it’s a comedy that’ll get axed after two episodes or it’s an American remake of a British show that will get axed after one episode. There appears to be a plethora of crime dramas on the air today, such as NCIS, NCIS: Los Angeles, CSI, CSI: New York, Hawaii Five-O, The Mentalist, Castle, Bones, Criminal Minds, Body of Proof, Blue Bloods, Southland…you get the idea. Every once and awhile, amidst the countless CSI spinoffs, there’s one cop drama gem that tries to take a unique look at the genre. Some of those include Justified and The Killing. The latest attempt at defining the genre is Fox’s The Following featuring the latest stud to switch from movies to television, Kevin Bacon (Mmmm…bacon). ...

Read more

Christians Rated R: Part II (How)

Last week, in response to the Papyrus opening up the entertainment section to reviewing rated “R” films, Austin Schumacher posted an article providing an argument why Christians should engage such films, even when they have received this rating because of objectionable or offensive content such as gruesome violence, blatant sexuality, or profane language. In this he cites reasons of the need to portray the reality of life in art - life can definitely be gruesome, blatant, and profane at times - as well as the fact that our sacred texts include stories with similar content. In discussions with me, Austin thought that I would do well at providing a part II to his initial article on “why” Christians should engage these types of film, and therefore, I have been drafted into tackling the idea of “how” Christians should go about this engagement. I have decided to go about this by first developing a theoretical model for engagement that can apply to all types of art - not just film - and then take the model and practically apply it to an “R” rated film to provide an example of how this theory works in practice. The application will come in the final installment of “Christians Rated R” next week, and this week I will focus on the theoretical aspect of engaging art. Because I’m splitting this into two weeks, this week’s article may seem to stray a bit on the broad side - away from films specifically - but hang with me until next week, and I hope it will begin to make a bit of sense. ...

Read more

                                                                       © 2017 Powered By GvilleDM

Scroll to top